005 – Rajkumar Lama – Kavre

ARTIST – TANITH GOULD
PHOTOGRAPHY – MAUDE EVILLIEU
INTERVIEW – HARRY MORGAN

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Rajkumar Lama’s grandfather was the village leader of his village – Bhummlu Salle, in Sindhupalchowk, one of the worst affected districts of Nepal. After his fathers death He continued to try to help the village by running an NGO that looked after the electricity supply in the village.

“On the day of the earthquake around 572 houses were damaged here. (62% fully destroyed and 50% were not good to stay in. we were mentally disturbed, and still now we have fear that the same thing might happen again.”

Rajkumar Lama’s grandfather was the village leader of his village – Bhummlu Salle, in Sindhupalchowk, one of the worst affected districts of Nepal. After his fathers death He continued to try to help the village by running an NGO that looked after the electricity supply in the village.

“On the day of the earthquake around 572 houses were damaged here. (62% fully destroyed and 50% were not good to stay in. we were mentally disturbed, and still now we have fear that the same thing might happen again.

“Now after a year, the Nepal Govt. has not still taken any fixed decision but they keep changing and the citizens are affected because of the confusion of the Nepal government. That’s why we still have mental fear and tensions. This has been going on for a long time in Nepal. We have a big problem with our economy. Most people go abroad to earn and depend on this income source, and the women also have to depend on their husbands earning. I feel this is not a good situation.

“Through our local NGO we Established a foundation for training the local women in different fields like tailoring, cattle and chicken farming, parlor training, so that they can start small businesses and support themselves. We are aiming to support this project through a micro financing system. We are looking for some donors in order to run the project, providing loans and funds to local women. We can divide the funds into different sectors, and keep funds running within the project. Our plan is to target 20 women each year for the training at the start, but that could go up to 60.

“I want the women to be a able to support themselves, and be able to pay the children’s education fees. They are happy because they are now independent. They now don’t have to spend their life just in the kitchen and are able to earn for their family like their husband. For that reason only, it’s important for us to have small local business. To earn and learn is like to read and write. Women in Nepal should stand for their right and equality, and build their confidence.”